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CODA, A Mother, A Wife, A Teacher, A Bookworm, An OutDoors Person, An Artist, An Info. Junkie...

Thursday, 31 May 2012

I Love You Fork Hooks

Photo: Click "LIKE" if you love these hooks!

Deaf Politics: Making Ourselves Seen

http://blog.deafpolitics.org/2012/05/making-ourselves-seen.html

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Making Ourselves Seen

BY OCTAVIAN ROBINSON


This is the Internet Age. In this age, civil rights movements have evolved to take advantage of online social media to make people heard and seen. Let’s make ourselves seen with social media for #captionthis to promote accessibility in online media and for #endoneendall to promote inclusion and equal treatment of deaf minorities in the NAD.

Imagine this: In 1963, the March on Washington attracted more than 200,000 people from all backgrounds. They packed the National Mall from one end to another.

March on Washington, 1963

This image, shown everywhere on the television and in print media, evoked a powerful message of widespread solidarity for the civil rights and economic equality of African-Americans. This image had a powerful impact on public opinion and proved the power of mass appeal.

In this day and age, anyone with Internet access can participate in mass movements to call for social justice and civil rights.

With Social Media, we can inspire the same powerful imagery. Every click on “like” on Facebook, YouTube, every retweet, one line postings on Facebook and Twitter, blogs, vlogs, and publicly posted e-mails equates to a face.

The leadership and the powers that be who operate our media outlets see in their mind’s eye a person, a number, and dollar signs for every click, post, and tweet made.

Every hashtag, such as #captionThis, #endoneendall, every tweet and post on Facebook is the modern day equivalent of the banners and signs carried in past Civil Rights demonstrations. Be sure to use hashtags (#). Hashtags make sure that we are seen as a collective group.

Deaf President Now, 1988

But this depends on your participation. Make yourselves seen. Make yourselves heard.

Imagine if the National Mall was half-empty, would the message have been as powerful?

Imagine if only Greg Hlibok, Bridgetta Bourne-Firl, Tim Rarus, Jerry Covell and a handful of people showed up to confront Jane Spilman and Phil Bravin at the Mayflower Hotel, would the message have been as powerful?

Imagine if only a few people showed up at marches and protests, would their message be as powerful?

Take action. You don’t have to leave the comfort of your homes or abandon your day-to-day lives. Just pick up your smartphone or open your web browser from the comfort of your chair. Take a second to click like or retweet. Take a minute to type a post on Facebook or write a 140 character tweet. Share links on your Facebook.

Every. One. Of. You. Count.

Importance Of Background Information


http://www.ehwhathuh.com/2012/05/importance-of-background-information.html?spref=fb

Importance of Background Information When Teaching Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

I am reading Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom (Amazon affiliate link) by Daniel T. Willingham. It contains useful practical information about how to engage students in their learning at school, especially those turned off from school for several good reasons.

The paragraph below taken from the book struck me. I think it relates to most deaf and hard of hearing students in terms of language acquisition.
As described here, comprehension depends on background knowledge, and that's where kids from privileged homes have an edge. They come to school with a bigger vocabulary and more knowledge about the world than underprivileged kids. And because knowing things makes it easier to learn new things (as described in the next section), the gap between privileged kids and under privileged kids widens. (Willingham (2009), I am not sure what page; 16% in Kindle version).
It makes sense to me that comprehension depends on background knowledge. One of the best ways to acquire background knowledge is to have a strong foundation in language. If you have weak language skills how easy would it be to amass background knowledge necessary for learning new concepts?

In relation to deaf education, the kids with a strong language foundation are the ones with the edge. They will have a bigger vocabulary and more knowledge about the world than the ones who don't have a strong language base. In most cases, typically hearing kids will have more of an edge than deaf and hard of hearing kids because they have more access to fluent language in all situations. Therefore because knowing things makes it easier to learn new things the gap between typically hearing students and deaf and hard of hearing students widens.

One can't expect a deaf or hard of hearing child without much language and background knowledge to easily excell in school (unless they happen to be super motivated and are able to understand new concepts quickly without much practice).

But with high expectations, creativity, an understanding of language development and hard work I believe it is possible for all students with little to no background knowledge and language to be successful in school and life.

Sunday, 27 May 2012

Deaf/Blind Collie's Success Story!

Parker is an 8-year old deaf/blind rough collie. He was rescued from a hoarder almost two years ago. Now, Parker does nosework and is a therapy dog, as well as promotes the education and awareness of deaf and blind dogs and merle-to-merle breeding through education tables at pet events. Parker is a perfect example of how one does not have to be able to hear or see to be successful! :)

Parker is an 8-year old deaf/blind rough collie. He was rescued from a hoarder almost two years ago. Now, Parker does nosework and is a therapy dog, as well as promotes the education and awareness of deaf and blind dogs and merle-to-merle breeding through education tables at pet events. Parker is a perfect example of how one does not have to be able to hear or see to be successful! :)

The Cookie Bite Chronicles Blog

Check out this witty and informative blog:

http://thecookiebitechronicles.wordpress.com/

I discovered in August 2009, aged 43, that I’ve got some mild mid-frequency (so called Cookie Bite) hearing loss in both ears which I’ve probably had all my life. You can read about how it was discovered here. I’ve been completely unaware that I’ve had a hearing loss up till now and I can hear perfectly well in quiet environments. Unfortunately my job as a lecturer on an art and design course involves conversing with groups of students across a noisy open-plan space and this is beginning to cause me a degree of difficulty which feels disproportionate to the small amount of loss I actually have. I am investigating ways of working round this, and hope that some of the strategies I’m about to unleash on my unsuspecting colleagues and students might actually improve the learning environment generally. Watch this space…

 Here is a post from this blog:

Can You Make Boring Beige Hearing Aids Cute?

Pinned Image

Yes…but  only if it’s inside this incredibly cute mouse hearing aid case, designed to protect the Siemens chroma S when it gets accidentally swiped off the top of the piano while the headphones are on. The insertion method does feel rather like giving a mouse a suppository, but we’ll gloss over that bit.
In the unlikely event that you should want to make your own, you can find the pattern it was adapted from here. The head is stuffed with kapok and the body cavity is stiffened with funky foam.

ASL Dolls

   

 

   

Dolls With Hearing Aids

Toy Doll with Hearing Aids  

Friday, 25 May 2012

Boy With Hearing Loss Inspires New Marvel Comic SuperHero!



http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/05/23/hearing-impaired-new-hampshire-boy-inspires-new-marvel-comics-super-hero/?intcmp=features

A hearing-impaired New Hampshire boy is now a superhero.

Marvel Comics has created a superhero called "Blue Ear" in honor of Anthony Smith, a 4-year-old boy from Salem, N.H., who was born with a chromosomal disorder that left him with severe hearing loss.
The boy, who has no right ear and only partial hearing in his left, wears a blue hearing aid that has enabled him to speak and attend school.

But Anthony -- a devoted comic book fan -- told his mother three weeks ago that he was no longer wearing the device because "superheroes don't wear blue ears," Fox affiliate WFXT reported.
Alarmed by the boy's refusal, his mother, Christina D'Allesandro, emailed Marvel Comics in New York City, asking for assistance.

The comic book publisher sent D'Allesandro a picture the next day of "Hawkeye," a superhero who lost 80 percent of his hearing and wears aids. The company then sent an image of its newest creation, a character called "Blue Ear," who it said was named after the boy, according to the station.
"It's amazing," D'Allesandro said of the company's response. She said her son brought the comic book pictures to his pre-school, which prompted teachers to hold a superhero week.

Thursday, 24 May 2012

ILY Bunny Shadow

Deaf Mother & Deaf 2 Year Old Daughter Signed Conversation



http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=3f4_1325817543

Ava, 2 yrs old having a conversation with her mom Lilli .Both are Deaf
One of the more touching videos I've watched. Conversation and language, something we all take pretty much for granted, takes a different path with this child and her mother. Beautiful really. Maybe I'm getting soft at my age. Thought I'd share...

FROM THE SOURCE:

This is a video of our daughter Ava, aged 24 months having a conversation with her mum Lilli at the dinner table.

We
are both deaf so we were able to sign from when Ava was born, hearing
parents should be given the chance to learn sign language and be able to
communicate with their own child fully. We think its important to note
that eventually it would be great to see this opportunity given to
grandparents, siblings, and other family members/carers.

Language is not a privilege, it is a right.

Darby The Hearing Dog Cartoon

Stamp Out Audism!

Deaf People Rock, ILY T-Shirt

Deaf Pride -- PAH!

Monday, 21 May 2012

Things That Could Only Happen To A Deaf Person

IMG_6500

(read the full list on this link below)
http://limpingchicken.com/2012/05/14/charlie-swinbourne-things-that-could-only-happen-to-a-deaf-person/

Charlie Swinbourne: Things that only happen to deaf people

Whether you’re a signer, a lipreader, a hearing aid wearer or a cochlear implant user, or maybe a bit of each of those (and some other things too), there are some things that truly only happen to a deaf person. Things that simply don’t happen to everyone else. Here’s my long-held list below. How many have happened to you?

When you tell people you are deaf, they ask if you understand Braille.

D-PAN ASL "Beautiful" Video



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6zVFGpGNJQ

D-PAN Presents Christina Aguliera's "Beautiful" performed in American Sign Language (ASL).

Please check out http://www.d-pan.com/


Lyrics:

[Spoken]
Don't look at me

Every day is so wonderful
Then suddenly, it's hard to breathe
Now and then, I get insecure
From all the pain, I'm so ashamed

I am beautiful no matter what they say
Words can't bring me down
I am beautiful in every single way
Yes, words can't bring me down
So don't you bring me down today

To all your friends, you're delirious
So consumed in all your doom
Trying hard to fill the emptiness
The pieces gone, left the puzzle undone
Is that the way it is

You are beautiful no matter what they say
Words can't bring you down
You are beautiful in every single way
Yes, words can't bring you down
Don't you bring me down today...

No matter what we do
(no matter what we do)
No matter what we say
(no matter what we say)
We're the song inside the tune
Full of beautiful mistakes

And everywhere we go
(everywhere we go)
The sun will always shine
(sun will always shine)
And tomorrow we might wake on the other side
All the other times

We are beautiful no matter what they say
Yes, words can't bring us down
We are beautiful in every single way
Yes, words can't bring us down
Don't you bring me down today

Don't you bring me down today
Don't you bring me down today

Auslan -- Australian Sign Language



http://networkedblogs.com/w3Yh8

But Klemzig Primary school in Adelaide is different! Whether you have good hearing or not, at this school you have to learn sign language! And there's a teacher signing in every lesson.
Awareness of Auslan is growing. Recently we've seen people signing next to politicians during emergency broadcasts. And the teachers here hope more schools will teach signing as a language. So who knows, perhaps playgrounds like this, are a sign of what's to come!