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CODA, A Mother, A Wife, A Teacher, A Bookworm, An OutDoors Person, An Artist, An Info. Junkie...

Thursday, 31 January 2013

That Deaf Guy "Screeech!"

Hello friends,
On an early morning trip to our local coffee house, I was re-arranging chairs for my family to sit down. When I looked up I was met with the most awful grimmaces staring in my direction. Kay quickly explained why. Gosh, who knew that a chair could make so much noise. Note to coffee shop owner: don't buy metal chairs! They are uncomfortable anyway. :)
Life is...loud!
-Matt and Kay
PS!!! Do you love "That Deaf Guy"? Well, you can buy the book and laugh yourself to sleep at night. "That Deaf Guy: A Family Portrait" is 120 pages of pure FUN and we all need to have more fun! Just click on the link below.
www.thatdeafguy.com/store

Hello friends,
On an early morning trip to our local coffee house, I was re-arranging chairs for my family to sit down. When I looked up I was met with the most... awful grimmaces staring in my direction. Kay quickly explained why. Gosh, who knew that a chair could make so much noise. Note to coffee shop owner: don't buy metal chairs! They are uncomfortable anyway. :)
Life is...loud!
-Matt and Kay
PS!!! Do you love "That Deaf Guy"? Well, you can buy the book and laugh yourself to sleep at night. "That Deaf Guy: A Family Portrait" is 120 pages of pure FUN and we all need to have more fun! Just click on the link below.
www.thatdeafguy.com/store

Gallaudet is celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Deaf President Now (DPN) Movement

Gallaudet is celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Deaf President Now (DPN) movement which ushered in the university’s first deaf president. To commemorate this milestone, Gallaudet will host a series of events throughout the semester. The first is a panel discussion with current President T. Alan Hurwitz and former Presidents Robert Davila and I. King Jordan. The university’s first three deaf presidents will describe their experiences and give insight on the transformative changes that have occurred at Gallaudet over the last 25 years.

Where:
Elstad Auditorium
Gallaudet University
800 Florida Avenue NE
Washington, DC 20002

When:
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
12:30 – 1:50 p.m.

Gallaudet is celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Deaf President Now (DPN) movement which ushered in the university’s first deaf president. To commemorate th...is milestone, Gallaudet will host a series of events throughout the semester. The first is a panel discussion with current President T. Alan Hurwitz and former Presidents Robert Davila and I. King Jordan. The university’s first three deaf presidents will describe their experiences and give insight on the transformative changes that have occurred at Gallaudet over the last 25 years.

Where:
Elstad Auditorium
Gallaudet University
800 Florida Avenue NE
Washington, DC 20002

When:
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
12:30 – 1:50 p.m.

4 Second Animated ASL Music Video (D-Pan's "We're Going To Be Friends)

Real Change Happens When...

In just a few weeks, we're launching our first-ever campaigns to change the way we make, use, and throw away Stuff and we need Changemakers like you with us every step of the way.

Take our Changemaker Quiz to find out what kind of Changemaker Personality you are before we all get started in this journey together! http://bit.ly/Changemaker

5 Must Have Apps For ASL Interpreters

http://www.streetleverage.com/2013/01/5-must-have-apps-for-sign-language-interpreters/

Below are 5 apps that may help you reclaim some of your sanity and be more productive in the process.

1. Leave Now

Tired of being “that interpreter?” Wish you knew exactly when to leave in order change your tardy ways? Wish no more. Leave Now will send an alert, which calculates for traffic delays, to your iOS device telling you exactly when to leave to be on time.
In the event you are going to be late, a single tap will send messages alerting people and giving them an ETA.
Cost: Free
Available for: iOS
Info: http://leavenowapp.com

2. Google Maps

Find yourself regularly doing the repeat 20mph drive-by only to discover you are on wrong Washington St? Well, no more drives of shame for you. Google Maps gives you the classic transit directions, Street View, and most impressively voice-guided turn-by-turn navigation.
Google Maps will also give you nearby places to grab a bite.
Cost: Free
Available for: iOS and Android
Info: http://www.google.com/mobile/iphone/ 

3.  Evernote

Sheepish about busting out that spiral notebook crammed with old agendas, receipts and coupons in order to capture job details or dialogue with a team interpreter? You know who you are! Evernote allows you to easily capture everything from personal musings to critical billing information.
You can quickly browse, edit and search on the information captured and it conveniently syncs across all of your iOs devices.
Cost: Free
Available for: iOs and Android (and more)
Info: http://evernote.com/evernote/ 
 

 4.  Expensify

Brandon Arthur
Brandon Arthur
Every superhero has their kryptonite. Do your powers of analyzing form, meaning and context go weak with the very thought of organizing and tracking expenses? Have no fear. Expensify makes it easy to record expenses and mileage as they occur, upload receipts by snapping a quick picture of them, and even track travel time. 
Expensify generates reports with the tap of your finger and integrates with QuickBooks to make invoicing a breeze.
Cost: Free (basic version)
Available for: iOS and Android (and more)
Info: http://help.expensify.com/mobile

5. Bump

An oldie, but a goodie! Go ahead and get your virtual man hug on by exchanging information with a colleague by “bumping” your phone with theirs. Bump allows you to exchange your contact info, calendar events, social media profiles and more simply and easily.
This will save

Switched At Birth -- Puts Deaf Culture In The Mainstream

 

http://www.tolerance.org/blog/switched-puts-deaf-culture-mainstream

Recently, I watched the first season of ABC Family’s Switched at Birth, a show that centers around two teenage girls from Kansas City, Mo. who were accidently switched at birth. Bay Kennish was raised by two parents, has a brother and comes from wealth. Daphne Vasquez lost her hearing after contracting meningitis, grew up an only child of a single mom and lives with her Puerto Rican grandmother in a working-class neighborhood. The two families come together to allow the girls to connect with their biological families.

There is much more drama including Daphne’s mom’s recovery from alcoholism and the teens’ dating lives. What I was most interested in, however, was seeing how Deaf and hard of hearing culture is handled. I have been enlightened. I had no previous insights into that culture. I don’t know anyone who is deaf. This television show also allowed me to gain perspective and have conversations that weren’t possible beforehand.

A friend, Cate, also watched the show. While her brother is deaf, she also had new insights and realized—for the first time—how her brother struggles during family reunions. The family relies on him to read their lips. Cate is now motivated to practice American Sign Language (ASL) and to expand her children's ASL vocabulary and fluency so that her brother (who is the only deaf person in the family) will not feel alienated.

Another friend, Tammy, was diagnosed with Meniere’s disease and is losing her hearing as a result of tumors that have grown in her ear. Two of her daughters are also hard of hearing. Tammy said she and her daughters have enjoyed the show because it has made them feel less like pariahs. It’s also helped Tammy better transition to a life in which she is now completely dependent on a hearing aid.
Even though the show is a one-hour drama, it offers characters not usually seen in mainstream media. There are many silent scenes in the show where characters communicate just using ASL. English subtitles are provided. My perspective shifted.

I appreciated that the show illustrates that deafness is not a deficit. Another poignant scene is when a deaf teenage boy and a hearing teenage girl are camping and looking at the stars. He remarks how peaceful it all is, while the girl is struggling to appreciate the moment because people camping around them are being really loud. Also, later in the season, one of the characters who relies on a device to help with hearing, is at the free-throw line at a basketball game. She turns off her aid, allowing her to block out the distracting noise from the crowds. She focuses on making the winning shot.
We still have a long way to go for inclusion on television, but this show is headed in the right direction. I think viewing a portion of an episode in class would open a wonderful discussion with students.
I want to learn more about ASL. I want my children to learn this unique language. I have started learning signs and using them with my toddler and his older siblings, and I love that they are learning there’s more than just one way to communicate and that every language and culture is to be appreciated for its uniqueness.

As a teacher, I haven't yet had the privilege of a hard of hearing student being a part of my class. I hope that what I’ve learned will help me be a better teacher for any future hard of hearing students. In the meantime, I will continue learning and sharing with my current students. I’ll look for opportunities to have discussions about Deaf and hard of hearing culture in the classroom. I want my class to be a community that is welcoming to all students. If anything, this has taught me how much more there is to learn and explore about my students' worlds.
Sansbury is a middle and high school English teacher in Georgia.

A Beautiful Woman...

Develop your inner beauty. Show your intelligence.

"Man Prayer" - Words by Eve Ensler, Film by Tony Stroebel



Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj7Zw4P8LPo

Violence against women hurts everyone, including men. We invite our brothers to take up this cause, and be free from the limiting strictures of our modern definition of masculinity! #MenRise

Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Malala: The Bravest Girl In The World (Will Receive Cochlear Hearing Aid)


Mighty Girl Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani girls’ education activist who was shot by the Taliban in an attempted assassination attempt last fall, has been awarded France’s Simone de Beauvoir Prize for Women’s Freedom. The international human rights prize is given annually to a “remarkable personality whose courage and thoughts are examples for everybody, in the spirit of Simone de Beauvoir who wrote: ‘The ultimate end, for which human beings should aim, is liberty, the only capable [thing], to establish every end on.’”

On acceptance of the award on her behalf her father said: “In my part of the world, fathers are known by their sons. Daughters are very much neglected. I am one of the few fortunate fathers who is known by his daughter.”

Malala was released from the UK hospital where she had been recovering earlier this month. Today, ABC News reported that within the next ten days, Malala “will undergo a three-hour procedure to attach a titanium plate to a large hole in her head and to implant a cochlear hearing device to replace her destroyed eardrum.” Her doctors expect her to make a full recovery and she has regained the ability to speak, read, and walk. 

Please join us in keeping Malala in our thoughts and prayers during this next stage of this courageous young woman’s recovery. 

To read about Malala’s recent award, visit http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/341393#ixzz2JD9kJkA4

The photo displayed here is from the cover of an edition of Newsweek which was released shortly after the shooting.
 
Mighty Girl Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani girls’ education activist who was shot by the Taliban in an attempted assassination attempt last fall, has been awarded France’s Simone de Beauvoir Prize for Women’s Freedom. The international human rights prize is given annually to a “remarkable personality whose courage and thoughts are examples for everybody, in the spirit of Simone de Beauvoir who wrote: ‘The ultimate end, for which human beings should aim, is liberty, the only capable [thing], to establish every end on.’”

On acceptance of the award on her behalf her father said: “In my part of the world, fathers are known by their sons. Daughters are very much neglected. I am one of the few fortunate fathers who is known by his daughter.”

Malala was released from the UK hospital where she had been recovering earlier this month. Today, ABC News reported that within the next ten days, Malala “will undergo a three-hour procedure to attac...h a titanium plate to a large hole in her head and to implant a cochlear hearing device to replace her destroyed eardrum.” Her doctors expect her to make a full recovery and she has regained the ability to speak, read, and walk.

Please join us in keeping Malala in our thoughts and prayers during this next stage of this courageous young woman’s recovery.

To read about Malala’s recent award, visit http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/341393#ixzz2JD9kJkA4

The photo displayed here is from the cover of an edition of Newsweek which was released shortly after the shooting.
See more

ILY Deaf World

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Monday, 28 January 2013

DTV Ghana -- State School For The Deaf (Fund Raising)



Click here to watch the video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTnJe-5cans

The State School for the Deaf (SSD) hosted the fund raising/ open-day ceremony at Adjei-Kojo, Ashaiman near Accra. It entertained the deaf pupils, their parents and guradians and teachers as well as friends where the dancers showed their skills in dancing and acting. It was really interesting.

More About DHH People In Ghana visit this link:
http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/blogs/blog.article.php?blog=4586&ID=1000011536

Today, in Ghana, Deaf people use Ghana Sign Language (GSL) which borrowed some signs from ASL as their communication and Ghana National Association of the Deaf (GNAD) still manages to make new signs for the deaf community, instead of ASL. However, they could use ASL and GSL together. GSL is the language of Ghana deaf people in the country based on concepts and visual gestural in nature as well as grammatical structures. Also apart from GSL and ASL, in the village of Adamorobe in the Eastern Region, the Deaf people have their own language which is called Adamorobe Sign Language. For example if one person from GSL community who has knowledge of GSL comes to Adamorobe and seems to speak the sign language, Deaf Adamorobians (the people of Adamorobe) may not recognise GSL. They control their society.

At the present, GNAD advocates for the use of Ghanaian Sign Language (GSL) in the schools for the Deaf in view of that GSL is the first language of the Deaf, which GNAD seems to manage to remove some signs of ASL, which was brought to the country. GNAD have ideas for creating new manuals. The signs would be changed into the new faces in the deaf community where Deaf people know ASL.

Signs Of Change In Thailand

 

Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/investigation/332827/signs-of-change-as-tv-newsman-talks-to-deaf

Bo Bo Kyaing is breaking ground as the first interpreter for the hearing-impaired to appear on the country's broadcast airways, but he says that when it comes to wider rights for people with his disability, the authorities are not listening.

He is attempting to fight prejudice against the deaf in his home country, and breaking ground with DVB, by appearing on its news broadcasts delivering the news using sign language for the first time in the country's history.

Saturday, 26 January 2013

Deaf Bulldog Dancing To Vibrations From Guitar

Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5c29H0VGtI&sns=fb

Adorable video of deaf bulldog dancing to the vibrations of his master's blues guitar goes viral

Just because you're deaf doesn't mean you can't have soul.
Which is what Jamynne Bowle's English bulldog demonstrates when the deaf pooch feels the blues in this adorable viral video.
Another dog, who isn't quite so depressed, watches in the background with a quizzical expression.

Deaf Chef Paul Hansen

Photo: Good Morning everyone!!!!
 
 I would like to introduce myself to you all. I am Deaf Chef Paul Hansen who has released a cookbook on November 9th 2012 titled "Sear Me Hear Me" which comes in 2 versions, paperback & eBook. 
 I also have a fan page for everyone to join. This page is all about sharing topics of the day, tips sharing, answers & questions sharing, Just type in the search box, Deaf Chef Paul Hansen, and click like to join in the fun. The link below in the comment box will have the link to it.

I would like to introduce myself to you all. I am Deaf Chef Paul Hansen who has released a cookbook on November 9th 2012 titled "Sear Me Hear Me" which comes in 2 versions, paperback & eBook.
I also have a fan... page for everyone to join. This page is all about sharing topics of the day, tips sharing, answers & questions sharing, Just type in the search box, Deaf Chef Paul Hansen, and click like to join in the fun.

ASL/Deaf Tattoos


Photo: I like it ASL tattoos <3


Photo

Jan White shares her tattoo photo.

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Ben Agnew shares his tattoo.

Cool "ASL" tattoo by AllHailZ ~ "My ASL tattoo completed. It's fingerspelled A-S-L for American Sign Language. The handcuffs represent the oppression and bans that ASL has been through in the past and the melting of the handcuffs symbolizes how incredibly lucky I am to be able to use American Sign Language today. The handcuffs melting symbolizes my freedom to use ASL. It's fingerspelled A-S-L for American Sign Language. The handcuffs represent the oppression and bans that ASL has been through in the past and the melting of the handcuffs symbolizes how incredibly lucky I am to be able to use American Sign Language today. The handcuffs melting symbolizes my freedom to use ASL." ~  http://allhailz.deviantart.com/art/Skin-Ink-Completed-341658273

Cool "ASL" tattoo by AllHailZ ~ "My ASL tattoo completed. It's fingerspelled A-S-L for American Sign Language. The handcuffs represent the oppression and bans t...hat ASL has been through in the past and the melting of the handcuffs symbolizes how incredibly lucky I am to be able to use American Sign Language today. The handcuffs melting symbolizes my freedom to use ASL. It's fingerspelled A-S-L for American Sign Language. The handcuffs represent the oppression and bans that ASL has been through in the past and the melting of the handcuffs symbolizes how incredibly lucky I am to be able to use American Sign Language today. The handcuffs melting symbolizes my freedom to use ASL." ~ http://allhailz.deviantart.com/art/Skin-Ink-Completed-341658273

"I See Deaf People."

Deaf Ed!

Christopher Jon Heuer - Deaf Education & Deaf Literacy



Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0rFDEOS1CM

Heuer describes illiteracy as being the biggest problem facing deaf students in the United States.

What Is wrong With Deaf Education?



Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUkulVvmbB4

Toby explains about how Deaf education is influenced by some hearing and shared his experience.

Bad Days Earn The Best Days...

"You have to fight through some bad days to Earn the Best Days of your life."-    (Comment with your thoughts.)

 post by team Ziglar www.Ziglar.com

Running Away From Your Problems...

~Via @[168081253297360:274:ツ The Awkward Moment When "The Awkward Moment" Isn't That Awkward ツ]~

Also Checkout ~
@[254264061309621:274:I Didnt Slap You!I Just High Fived your face]~

~@[145435255579528:274:⋆⋆⋆I ἧɇɇd ᾶ rɇṣẗᾶṙẗ Bửẗẗoἧ iἧ Mỵ Ḷifἔ⋆⋆⋆ \:"(]~
~~A♥

The World of Deaf Culture Videos (Parts 1-4)

Paul LeDrew, Feb. 1st St. Catharines, Ont.

Join Paul LeDrew on Friday, February 1st at the Kiwanis Aquatics Centre in St. Catharines, ON for his lecture on "Conceptually Accurate Signs". ** $5 admission, 7-9pm, ASL/English Interpreted **

Join Paul LeDrew on Friday, February 1st at the Kiwanis Aquatics Centre in St. Catharines, ON for his lecture on "Conceptually Accurate Signs". ** $5 admission, 7-9pm, ASL/English Interpreted **

Deaf Korean Teenager Tennis Player



Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/deaf-teenager-says-disability-can-help-him-reach-the-top-8460937.html


Hearing the sound of the ball coming off your opponent's racket usually tells you a lot about its trajectory and the shot you will have to play next. Lee Duck-hee would not know about such things. The 14-year-old South Korean has been deaf since birth, which makes his progress in the junior game all the more remarkable.
Lee, who is one of the younger players taking part in the boys' tournament here at the Australian Open...

"Actually, I don't care about my disability at any time, and on the court it's easy to focus on my match because I can't hear anything," Lee said yesterday through an interpreter, having lip-read reporters' questions.

Lee, who refuses to make a big issue of his disability and was surprised at the media interest in him, said he prefers not to mention his deafness to opponents or officials, though it can cause problems. There were a number of occasions in yesterday's match when he was not aware that balls had been called out. Officials were not given specific instructions, but on several occasions Thomas Sweeney, the umpire, used hand signals to communicate his decisions.

"I do worry about that because today it happened a lot of times," Lee said. "The chair umpire already called 'wait', but I couldn't hear that, so there were a lot of lets. I wanted to see big [gestures] from the umpire during the match."

Although he cannot benefit from a crowd's vocal support, Lee claimed that not hearing anything made it easier for him to concentrate. Meanwhile his coach, Hoon Park-kyung, said he had developed a special relationship with him because of his deafness.

Euity For Deaf People, Oct. 16-18 2013, Australia

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Friday, 25 January 2013

Life Never Gets Easier...

Life Never Gets Easier. You Just Get Stronger. ¤ @[207374922614903:274:Quotes Mantra]

Hungary Recognizes Deaf As Linguistic Minority (Not Disabled)!!!!

Hungary has an excellent example of a Deaf-inclusive constitution. In 2009, the country produced legislation that recognizes Deaf not as people with disabilities, but as a linguistic minority.

Read the article here...
http://ow.ly/h8qL6, and take a look at Article H of the constitution (translated to English) here... http://ow.ly/h8rfl
 

911 Staff Will Text Messages With Deaf Canadians!

Canadians with hearing impairments much register their phone number with their wireless service provider in order to be able to text message with 911 staff.

Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/01/24/tech-911-texting.html?cmp=rss

Canadians with hearing loss must register their phone number with their wireless service provider in order to be able to text message with 911 staff.

Canadians who have hearing or speech problems will soon be able to send text messages to 911 services.

Other Canadians, however, must continue to communicate with 911 services over the phone, says Canada's telecommunications regulator.

By Jan. 24, 2014, all telephone and wireless companies must upgrade their networks to support text messaging communication with Canadians who have hearing and speech impairments. The service may become available before then in areas where the upgrades are completed early.

The Call for Papers for the 2nd International Conference of the World Federation of the Deaf


 
CALL FOR PAPERS
2nd International Conference of the World Federation of the Deaf
Dates: 16 - 18 October 2013
Place: Sydney, Australia

The Call for Papers for the 2nd International Conference of the World Federation of the Deaf is available now on the website - http://wfdsydney2013.com/papers.php, in which you can submit online. Information in International Sign is also available in the website.

The Organising Committee of the conference is looking for challenging, exciting and informative presentations that address the theme: "Equality for Deaf People".

• what equality means,
• how it can be achieved,
• what tools we have to use in seeking equality,
• whose responsibility is it.

The deadline for sending the papers is on 1 February 2013.

More information on the conference: http://wfdsydney2013.com/

http://youtu.be/bY7PfBBstac

Sean Forbes Live Jan. 25th, Rochester NY @ 7pm

Looking forward to the show tonight!!!!

Thursday, 24 January 2013

Obama Signing ILY

President Obama showing his love for the parade participants by signing I Love You in ASL!  # signingfamilies

President Obama showing his love for the parade participants by signing I Love You in ASL! # signingfamilies

That Deaf Guy "Deaf House"

Hello friends,
Our boy is so use to our Deaf/Hearing house that he really notices during a sleep over how "different" his friends house is compared to ours. We are proud that what makes our house "different" to the outside world is perfectly normal to him and even provides him with a sense of security and comfort.
Life is...great. 
-Matt and Kay
PS Yes, you can have your very own "That Deaf Guy" webcomic book to have and to hold. Forever and ever! Just click on the link below it is 120 pages of pure joy and laughter. Buy one or two or 100 today!! www.thatdeafguy.com/store

Hello friends,
Our boy is so use to our Deaf/Hearing house that he really notices during a sleep over how "different" his friends house is compared to ours. We ...are proud that what makes our house "different" to the outside world is perfectly normal to him and even provides him with a sense of security and comfort.
Life is...great.
-Matt and Kay

PS Yes, you can have your very own "That Deaf Guy" webcomic book to have and to hold. Forever and ever! Just click on the link below it is 120 pages of pure joy and laughter. Buy one or two or 100 today!! www.thatdeafguy.com/store

Monday, 21 January 2013

Deaf Tennis Player Soldiers On

Tennis_generic8

Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.iol.co.za/sport/tennis/deaf-tennis-player-soldiers-on-1.1455232#.UP0qP3P52H8

Melbourne – Korean youngster Lee Duck-hee dreams of life at the top of the tennis world. It is a dream shared by elite junior players the world over, but what makes Lee different is that he is deaf.
In a sport in which players lean heavily on their hearing to calibrate their timing, gauge levels of spin and power and feed off the support of the crowd, Lee's disadvantage is greater than might first be suspected.

But the 14-year-old who has been deaf from birth refuses to make a big deal of his disability.
Lip-reading, then speaking through an interpreter, Lee told reporters at the Australian Open that, in fact, he would rather not even mention his deafness to opponents or officials.

“The one thing that's difficult is the communication with the umpires, both chair umpires and linesmen,” he said. “I don't hear the calls, especially the out calls, so sometimes ... just continue. That's kind of difficult but it's nothing special.”

Most Dangerous...

Photo

Confidence!

Just keep going.

Top 10 iPhone Apps

Top 10 iPhone Apps for People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Thomsen Young compiled a handy list of the top 10 "most useful" iPhone apps for deaf and hard of hearing consumers. This is what he has to say about them:

Purple Communications: Unlike TTY or TDD systems, Purple Communications allows you to make phone call...s and even better, video phone calls. You have the option to be connected to an operator who then reads your messages to the recipient and transcribes their messages back to you. Or better, you can video call your friends/families yourself and communicate via sign and if they’re not there, you can leave a video message in ASL.

Clear Captions: Clear Captions transcribes phone calls, as they happen, in English or in Spanish. Using a headset, Clear Captions allows you to see the text of a phone call in real-time while hearing it, making it much easier to understand conversations. ClearCaptions is a free captioning service that works together with your phone and your Internet-connected computer. ClearCaptions on your phone call is similar to closed captions on your TV; you can hear AND read what’s being said. This takes the frustration out of hearing on the phone. Instead of asking people to repeat themselves or guessing at what was said, you can read the person’s words which display during your call.

Z4 Mobile: Z4 Mobile allows you to make both point-to-point and VRS calls on your iPhone 4 or iPod Touch (4th Generation). It turns iPhone 4 or iPod Touch into a mobile videophone.

Sorenson Video Center: The Sorenson Video Center allows users of Sorenson Video Relay Service to take videos from a videophone and view them on an iPhone or an iPod Touch. It connects to one's Sorenson account, which it uses to access videos, IP Relay services, and provide easy ways to respond to SignMail videos. It also interfaces with the iPhone's contacts system and many instant messaging services.Significant improvement since the last post.

iASL: iASL is a comprehensive American Sign Language application. It includes a video dictionary, translators, automatic spelling correction, and a number of resources for study. At 403 megabytes, it's a large application, but as an ASL teaching resource, it's highly valuable. Given its large quantity of video content, it's one application that could be better on the iPad's huge screen. Again, significant improvement since the last post and greatly expanding.

TED+SUB: You can watch TED talks with subtitle in your language, watch TED talks that 'Best of the Web', and you can search using both English and your language. This app also gives you the ability to downl TED talks and watch later without WiFi connection. TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design.

Tout: Something of like Twitter, but should be taken advantage by deaf/hard of hearing people! Launched in mid-April as a free iPhone app. (The Android version is due late this summer.) Tout allows a user to record a 15-second video from their iOS device, and then post it to their Facebook or Twitter account. While it is a third-party app, the video will also post on a user’s Tout account at the Tout webpage. Even Shaq is doing it ;-)

eBuddy: a multi-function messaging application that makes it possible to make free calls as well as live IM chats from an iPhone or iPod touch over either a WiFi connection or a 3G one. It interfaces to many services, like MSN Messenger, Google Talk, Twitter, and AOL Instant Messenger, and for consolidating all of these into a single application, it could be quite useful.

Captionfish: Historic mobile application is the first to offer streaming captioned movie trailers for the deaf and hard of hearing community on the iPhone. Here are some of the great features you can enjoy on this app: Effortless search, ability to find all the accessible show times playing at theaters within 60 miles of the selected area. You can watch movies trailers with captions as well as get the synopses for all current and upcoming movies. Lastly, you can find theater addresses and view their upcoming schedules!

Dragon Dictation: The Dragon Dictation app is a voice to text app. It's made by Dragon Naturally speaking and it's free. Dragon Dictation turns spoken speech into text. There are several advantages for using this app, first, if you’re having a hard time understanding what your friend is saying, they can say it again using this app and bingo, you know exactly what they said. Secondly, if you’re hard of hearing, you can use it to practice your speech.

Another Paul Scearce Artwork

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Sunday, 20 January 2013

The Biggest Disability Is A Negative Attitude!

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Technology Helps Deaf Homeless Man




Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/11/nyregion/technology-makes-life-a-little-easier-for-homeless-and-deaf-ethiopian-immigrant.html?smid=tw-share&_r=1&

He said he came to the United States in 2001 thanks to an immigration lottery, and is now an American citizen. After a brief period in Minnesota, he moved to the Washington area, a nexus of the Ethiopian community in the United States.

It is also the home of Gallaudet University, the renowned school for the deaf, where Mr. Zemedagegehu took language courses. In Washington, he said, he had a home and a job — until he lost both after a back injury from lifting packages at FedEx about four years ago.

Despite his struggles in the United States, he said, “the opportunity for a deaf individual is far better here than in Ethiopia. You can drive here, the interpreting service is far better here, the job opportunities for the deaf.”

Some of the problems Abreham Zemedagegehu faces as a homeless person in New York, like cold weather and lack of sleep, are fairly predictable. Some are less so: the police have gotten angry with Mr. Zemedagegehu because they did not realize that he could not hear their instructions. He was born with no hearing in one ear and only a little in the other.

...talking to his doctor, consulting with social-service providers or being interviewed by a newspaper reporter, Mr. Zemedagegehu is aided by an American Sign Language interpreter. Technology has made this process relatively simple: he uses a Web camera to sign with an interpreter, who talks on the phone with his hearing conversation partner.

Saturday, 19 January 2013

KODAWest

KODAWest

http://www.kodawest.org/

KODAWest is a non-profit, 501(c)3 organization which serves hearing children with parent/s who are deaf. Their mission is to bring these KODA s (Kids Of Deaf Adults) together in a support/peer group type of environment, such as camps and cultural enrichment programs. With this unique fellowship, these children will gain confidence and wisdom which will help them develop a better understanding of, and ability to embrace their two worlds: the hearing and the deaf. This organization also aims to provide resources and support workshops to deaf parents who face common issues while raising their KODAs.

SERVICES

Camps
Our biggest event of the year is the low-cost camp for these underserved KODAs. At this one-week camp, our campers will participate in leadership and team building skills as well as many other fun activities. Most importantly, they will attend KODA workshops run by the Camp Director, who is a Child (over the age of 18) of Deaf Adults (CODA). These workshops are an opportunity for the children to come together in a supportive and unified setting.
Workshops
Another important service we provide within this unique community is the low-cost workshops for the deaf parents. Many of these parents have minimal ideas of what is important in a hearing child’s life, such as music, and/or identifying sounds or noises. Often times, parents will depend on their children for interpreting situations, which can cause resentment in their children. Therapists, who have extensive knowledge in bi-cultural living, especially in hearing/deaf cultures, will be brought in to support and educate these under-informed parents.
Events
Throughout the year, we host several events, which bring together these diverse families; such as our annual Day At The Beach and Family Bowling Nights for entire families; Spring Flings and Museum Expeditions for toddlers; Laser Tag Adventures for our KODA ‘Tweens, and The Ultimate Concert Experience, for our KODA Teens. These events allow families to meet, interact, and share experiences with one another.

RESOURCES

We are looking to establish a network of families and KODA organizations from around the world, to a build a stronger community for our KODAs and sharing resources. We are also aiming to build a library of articles, documentaries, and books related to the KODA culture.

KODAWest @ Barnes & Noble Bookfair Feb. 24th

Desktop Captioning Phone



http://deafnewstoday.blogspot.ca/2013/01/desktop-captioning-phone.html

A new phone unveiled last week offers a new tool for the deaf and hard-of-hearing when it comes to making calls. Clarity's Ensemble phone is a corded desktop unit that amplifies sound as much as 50 decibels using the same technology found in many expensive hearing aids. Plus, you can read what the other party is saying through a 7-inch color touch-screen text display. The text is provided by call center agent at Purple Communication, so Ensemble offers near-real-time speed captioning. The cost is $229 for the until while the captioning is free.  Find out more here.

A Captioning 1st!

http://deafnewstoday.blogspot.ca/2013/01/a-captioning-first.html

This week's presidential inauguration will include a closed captioning first--attendees will be able to read closed captioning of the proceedings on their smartphones. It is one of several innovations that organizers say will make this inauguration more accessible than any before. The Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies says it is working diligently to make this an ADA-friendly inauguration.

Butterfly ILY Pins

Beginnings For Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing



http://www.ncbegin.org/

BEGINNINGS of North Carolina is a non-profit agency providing an impartial approach to meeting the diverse needs of families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing and the professionals who serve them.  BEGINNINGS’ staff members provide valuable technical information, emotional support, resources and referrals to parents and professionals. Services are free to parents in the state of North Carolina.

Untitled By Hossein Zare

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