About Me

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CODA, A Mother, A Wife, A Teacher, A Bookworm, An OutDoors Person, An Artist, An Info. Junkie...

Friday, 29 March 2013

Important To Report -- Call 911



Click here to watch the video:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=358690447568709

What does COMMUNITY ACCOUNTABILITY look like?

Deafhood Defined

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Discrimination

Discrimination: Discrimination is the prejudicial and/or distinguishing treatment of an individual based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or category, such as their race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, color, ethnicity, religion, language, disability, age, socioeconomic status, or other characteristics.[1] It involves the group's initial reaction or interaction, influencing the individual's actual behavior towards the group or the group leader, restricting members of one group from opportunities or privileges that are available to another group, leading to the exclusion of the individual or entities based on logical or irrational decision making.
Discrimination:

1. The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people or things, esp. on the grounds of race, age, or sex.

2. Recognition and understanding of the difference between one thing and another.


How often are Deaf restricted? Excluded? Distinguishably treated? Let’s ask ourselves that question.

The moment a deaf child is born, the clock starts ticking against them. The hospital immediately screens your child for an early infant hearing test.(Not even a week old!) They are already rushed to find out if this baby is deaf or not. When the results come back as your child having a hearing loss suddenly you as a parent are battling professionals on all fronts. You are a new parent, you are still getting used to having a beautiful baby in your arms. You are most vulnerable during this period because you want to make sure you do everything you should for your newly born child. You are bombarded with negativity about deafness, no knowledge or mention of American Sign Language, you are made to believe that your child will have a higher quality of life if he or she has the ability to speak and hear (if you don’t provide medical intervention you are neglecting your baby). Yet generations and generations of Deaf children and Deaf adults have thrived and succeeded in life without.

Deaf people experience discrimination within their own family, their work, doctor’s offices, hospitals, and any other places of services that all Deaf people should have a privilege and a right as citizens to access.

Deaf people are discriminated as children. From the time they are small. They are pitied, they are felt sorry for, and they are looked as form of a lower/second class minority. They are often left out, ignored, excluded and restricted without having their needs provided for.

Labels are already floating around the Deaf child, pressure to get CI’s, pressure that Deaf children have to be the exact same as their family (hearing) instead of recognizing their individuality. The majority of parents do not sign to their Deaf children. There are left feeling isolated, frustrated, angry and painfully reminded that they will never have that deep relationship. You have to ask yourself…what is that? Unfortunately it all leads to discriminatory acts. You realize that communication is a foundation for relationships for children to learn, to grow; and to understand values and to flourish as any child would.

Without having that access to communication and language which often time is thought to be mouth and ears, instead of hands and eyes. American Sign Language is a language. A very beautiful language. If you had a child who was adopted in France and spoke French would you exclude that child? Even though she knew not one world of English? Would you ignore her and continue to chat amongst your English speaking family and not try to translate? Would you want to learn French so that you would be able to gain trust, develop a close bond and have meaningful conversations? Or if she is a toddler (sing her a lullaby?)

You can do the same with a Deaf child. Tell stories in ASL, you can do nursery rhymes in ASL; the options are unlimited as what you can communicate with your Deaf child! You are using a language but one that requires hands and eyes. You don’t have to hear the world for it to be beautiful, you can see it.

Doctor’s office often tells Deaf it is not necessary for an interpreter. They will just talk slow or write. Unfortunately you as a Deaf person have rights to access your own language. Doesn’t matter what professional think or feel, trying to waive that cost or pinch a few pennies for an interpreter. Deaf people in some ways are so used to being discriminated that they start to justify it. You begin to minimize the actions done against you and that maybe you are just being too sensitive.

Workplaces are one of the most likely places that Deaf deal with discrimination. Employers are supposed to be protecting your rights and your ability to access services as a Deaf employee. Yet often times it is Deaf who are blamed for wrong doings of another employee (because they cannot hear what is being said behind them, or hearing individual blaming Deaf for sloppy work and yet it was another person). Deaf workers are made to work harder, faster and without any support provided as far as interpreters. They are forced to read notes, lip-read and endure extreme mental strain daily. Some Deaf people are mocked, teased and made fun of saying it is just a joke (at the end of the day it wears on your self esteem). Favorism is spread over to the hearing employees and yet Deaf work just as hard if not even harder.

Families aren’t motivated to sign and yet these Deaf adults and children often missing the entire picture. They long, they want that beautiful bond between family and them. Rejection is at its peak. We ask ourselves will things ever change. Will I ever been accepted? Will they ever really “hear” me?

One Deaf man was beside his mother on her dying bed, he passed a pad of paper for her to write something to him. She uttered her last words and passed away. Unfortunately he would go through the rest of his life wondering what his mother wanted to say to him. What she wanted him to know.

Understanding how much of a barrier it is not having full access to communication is a huge wall that brings division. Sadly because there is no communication it often leads to discrimination whether it is intentional or not.

When there is no motivation for ASL it also leads to exclusion, on top of the piling evidence that Deaf people deal with every day dealing with full fledge hearing world we are simply forgotten. We are the last of the last.
See more

Unlocking The Door To Deafhood

Here is my new De'VIA artwork, "Unlocking the Door to Deafhood".

Paul Scearces new De'VIA artwork, "Unlocking the Door to Deafhood".

Wednesday, 27 March 2013

Prominent Deaf People

Equity For All

Photo: Veditz once said, "As long as we have Deaf people on earth, we will have signs." Can you imagine a world without beautiful sign languages? Every human being on earth is valued.

DOT Reconizes Deaf & Hard-Of-Hearing Truck Drivers!



Click here to read the whole article:
http://www.nad.org/news/2013/2/dot-recognizes-deaf-and-hard-hearing-truck-drivers


In a historic victory for deaf and hard of hearing truckers, the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) announced today, after decades of prohibition, that deaf drivers can operate commercial motor vehicles such as large trucks. Today, the DOT granted 40 applications filed by the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) seeking exemption from the hearing standard that has barred deaf drivers from obtaining commercial drivers’ licenses (CDLs). In announcing this historic decision, the DOT cited research demonstrating that deaf drivers are as safe as hearing drivers.

Deaf Culture, History & Importance

"Deaf Culture: Culture, History, and Importance"
(Source: Unknown)

Many people think of hearing loss as a disability, but many members of the Deaf community do not see it that way. Deaf people in this country are a linguistic subculture. They identify themselves as Deaf, as an ethnic identity, and not a physical condition. People who identify themselves as Deaf belong to a proud and distinctive subcultural group known as the Deaf community. The uppercase "Deaf" is used to identify those who are members of the Deaf community. They feel they are simply a linguistic minority, and are no more in need of a cure for their condition than are Haitians or Hispanics.

Composed of people who use American Sign Language as their primary means of communication, the Deaf community has over the past 150 years developed a rich social life and folklore. Though their own efforts to meet their own needs, Deaf people have organized a national and international network of social, religious, athletic, dramatic, scholarly, and literary organizations serving local, national and international memberships. Every four years, for example, the World Games for the Deaf (the Deaf Olympics) brings together deaf athletes from many countries to compete for international prizes. Other important Deaf Organizations are:

National Theater for the Deaf
Gallaudet University
National Association for the Deaf
Miss Deaf America Pageant
World Federation of the Deaf
American Athletic Association of the Deaf
World Recreation Association of the Deaf
National Fraternal Society of the Deaf

The Deaf community has social norms and values particular to their society, which are passed from generation to generation, but it recruits memberships in a unique fashion. In general, human culture is passed down within families. But because 90% of deaf children have two hearing parents, only a minority of Deaf community members acquire their cultural identity and distinctive social skills at home. Most Deaf children learn about deaf culture in schools for the Deaf, from other children, teachers, and dormitory leaders. Nonetheless, the cultural link is strong, and the Deaf community is quite cohesive. A high percentage of members (90%) marry within the group.

A number of people have begun to study Deaf folklore. They have collected jokes, legends, games, riddles, etc. based on American Sign Language and the experiences of Deaf people. In addition, linguists have isolated some of the characteristics and values of Deaf culture. Some of these characteristics are:

Membership in the Deaf community is usually based on deafness, although many children of deaf adults, interpreters, and other persons fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) often become "part" of the deaf community.
There is a heavy emphasis on vision. American Sign Language (ASL), a visual mode of communication, is the language used within the Deaf community. Members gain the vast majority of their information through their eyes, and by a observing closely what is happening around them.
There is a specific set of social norms. The accepted forms of etiquette within the Deaf community are somewhat different from those in the general society. For example:
Members do not generally use their voices with Deaf friends, but will with hearing persons. In fact, many members of the Deaf community disassociate themselves from speech.
Members will wave, tap or throw a small piece of paper to attract a person’s attention.
In Deaf culture, it is polite to "talk", that is sign, with one’s mouth full, but speaking with one’s hands full is not done.
Members use a variety of devices to replace ordinary alarm clocks, doorbells, telephones, fire alarms, etc..
Deaf culture had no prohibition against staring, because it is necessary for effective communication. In hearing culture, however it is often considered rude.
Members place a strong emphasis on fostering and maintaining social ties within the community.

Research on the Deaf community, its values, mores, and folklore, is in its infancy. Several social scientist are presently working to develop a more detailed and accurate picture of this distinctive way of life. The Gallaudet Deaf President Now protest, The Academy-Award winning actress, Marlee Matlin, and the selection of a deaf 1994-1995 Miss America, Heather Whitestone, have contributed to the increase in general awareness of the Deaf population and its unique characteristics.

Facts about Deaf Community

The Deaf community is separate from other disability consumer groups by the virtue of communication process, not physical disabilities.
The Deaf community considers itself a minority group, a separate entity because of its unique culture, language and social norms.
Within the Deaf community, there are approximately eight subgroups and 20 communication modes/sign language systems.
The Deaf community is a multi-cultural community that includes African-Americans, Asian Pacific-Islanders, Hispanics, Native Americans, to name a few.
Hearing people get about 75% of their information through aural means such as radio, television and other people’s conversations. Therefore, about 25% of information acquired is through other methods. Of this 25% receivable information, deaf people acquire only half and sometimes even less.
Since American Sign Language is not a written language, some deaf people’s reading and writing skills vary between third and fifth grade level. Other deaf people who are fluent in English and ASL will have higher reading and writing level.
A typical Deaf person’s thought process is more in terms of visual and logical concepts, not verbal and auditory concepts.
The median economic level of the Deaf community is below the lower middle class.
Many Deaf people receive Supplementary Security Income (SSI) as their means of support.
Demographically, the Deaf community parallels other minority groups in terms of underachievement, underemployment and unemployment.
For years, Deaf people have experienced oppression though inferior education, and by hearing people’s denial of the Deaf culture and ASL as a language.

Switched At Birth Won A Peabody Award!

George Foster Peabody Awards

http://peabodyawards.com/2013/03/72nd-annual-peabody-awards-complete-list-of-winners/

We're proud to announce that Switched at Birth won a Peabody award! http://bit.ly/11MzDAU

Tain Tells ASL Story

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Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hn1naIfR9vU&feature=share&list=UUp-T4CwPfrd7-iBC6MjsiiA

(annotated) Tonight, Tian started telling his dad a story. He began, "Tian and Travis both born in China. We wait, wait, wait. You and mommy wait, wait, long time.. Look for Tian and Travis...." The story picks up from there...
Tian is hard-of-hearing. He hears quite well and speaks well, but was visiting with his dad, who is Deaf. He already appropriately code-switches, which is the cutest thing ever!
Read about our family, adoption, homeschooling, and bilingual life at
www.thebrownfamily.us
Subscribe to see more videos! I have a number of new ones recorded, but need to get them edited and up. Thanks for watching!
PS. I hope to have it captioned properly, but for now, it is annotated with subtitles. :)

To watch more videos click the Youtube link:
http://www.youtube.com/user/txbrown5?feature=watch

The World's Quietest Room

The world's quietest room is an anechoic chamber at Orfield Laboratories that is 99.99% sound absorbent.

Watch an explanatory video: http://bit.ly/ZXU3mF

Image: via Science is Madness
 
The world's quietest room is an anechoic chamber at Orfield Laboratories that is 99.99% sound absorbent.

Watch an explanatory video:
http://bit.ly/ZXU3mF

Image: via Science is Madness

ASL Bicentennial

Tuesday, 26 March 2013

Switched At Birth "Take Over"

What were your thoughts on this scene from the Switched at Birth spring finale?

Deaf Gathering Of Nations

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Deaf In The Family

Photo: yesssss

Campus MovieFest "Noisy Silence"

Click here to watch the video
http://www.campusmoviefest.com/movies/20632-noisy-silence

  • Noisy Silence
GTA Nominee - Director, Campus Best Drama, Campus Finalist, GTA Nominee - Actress Description: A deaf high school student struggles to live in a hearing world. Please like us on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/NoisySilenceMovie Deaf individuals in our society continue to be oppressed because of their hearing disability. It is always assumed that they cannot think, read, or write. It is assumed that they pity themselves, or that they dislike being deaf when the opposite is true. They OWN their disability and love their culture. They are extremely intelligent and strong people, however, their culture is discriminated against by the world they live in. This film aims to depict life in a hearing world through the lens of a deaf student facing challenges on a daily basis. Directed & Edited by Daniel Mall Produced by Daniel Mall Films, Inc. http://www.danielmallfilms.com facebook! https://www.facebook.com/mallfilms

Teach2Connect

Hey there NTID/RIT Faculty!

Social Workers for the Deaf Explained

 

Click here to watch the video:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=357527367685017

Thursday, 21 March 2013

Tuesday, 19 March 2013

ASL Reading With Son

Lauren Ridloff

Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mPcyAWDxbc

Free Deaf World!



VENEZ VOIR NOTRE SITE OFFICIEL: CLIQUEZ WWW.MAINSDIAMANT.COM

CONTACTEZ-NOUS : contact@mainsdiamant.com DIRECTEMENT
 
FR : "Mains Diamant" améliore la condition sociale des sourds et crée une meilleure relation entre sourds et entendants.

EN : "Mains Diamant" improves social condition about deaf and build a better relationship between deaf and hearing.

Cannot Compare...

Reading Upside Down (Doodles By Carlisle)

Upside down reading... that’s one of secret super senses that we deaf people have! ;)  I love it when a hearing person has a great penmanship because that means I can easily read the note upside down or sideways. 



[5 panels]

[Panel 1: A cashier, standing behind counter, is writing to Alexis, who is standing across him. To Alexis, the note is upside down but she is able to read, “Do you want a drink-“ Before the cashier could finish, Alexis says, “Yes.”]  

[Panel 2: The cashier wrote another note, which reads, “Would you like chips to-“. Alexis, being able to read the note upside down, interrupts the cashier with a reply, “No.”]

[Panel 3: The cashier wrote another note, which reads, “Your food will be ready soo-“ Alexis, being able to read the note upside down, again interrupts the cashier with a reply, “Okay!”]

[Panel 4: The cashier is taken aback, thinking to himself in a thought bubble, “Whoa… Deaf people are FAST upside down readers!” Alexis hands a note to the cashier, which reads, “Amazing, I know!”]

[Panel 5: The cashier, reading the note, is very shocked, thinking to himself, “THEY CAN READ MINDS TOO?!” Alexis, walking away, is giggling.]



Upside down reading... that’s one of secret super senses that we deaf people have! ;) I love it when a hearing person has a great penmanship because that means... I can easily read the note upside down or sideways.

[5 panels]

[Panel 1: A cashier, standing behind counter, is writing to Alexis, who is standing across him. To Alexis, the note is upside down but she is able to read, “Do you want a drink-“ Before the cashier could finish, Alexis says, “Yes.”]

[Panel 2: The cashier wrote another note, which reads, “Would you like chips to-“. Alexis, being able to read the note upside down, interrupts the cashier with a reply, “No.”]

[Panel 3: The cashier wrote another note, which reads, “Your food will be ready soo-“ Alexis, being able to read the note upside down, again interrupts the cashier with a reply, “Okay!”]

[Panel 4: The cashier is taken aback, thinking to himself in a thought bubble, “Whoa… Deaf people are FAST upside down readers!” Alexis hands a note to the cashier, which reads, “Amazing, I know!”]

[Panel 5: The cashier, reading the note, is very shocked, thinking to himself, “THEY CAN READ MINDS TOO?!” Alexis, walking away, is giggling.]

Monday, 18 March 2013

Little Hands Express

Learn sign :).

Soliciting At A Deaf Residence

Deaf Humour :)

ASL Deaf Pride Parade 4/19/13

Please share it with your Deaf friends and hearing allies.  Join ASL Deaf Pride Parade marching to the White House for full recognition of our linguistic human rights !

Reach Your Destination...

Thank you my dear friend Tejas Patel From @[84263639398:274:Wisdom Quotes] for these wise words. =D Please pop by and Like his amazing page. =)

Please feel free to: Like ☮ Tag ☮ or ☮ Share www.positiveandinspirationalquotes.blogspot.com www.melaniemoushigian.blogspot.com www.inspirationalpicturequotes.blogspot.com

Sean Forbes Inspiring Message

@[76018689284:274:Fox29 News Express] in Philly steps into the life of Sean Forbes as he prepares to release his debut album, "Perfect Imperfection." Watch the crowds reaction to his inspiring message: http://bit.ly/10849lI

Fox29 News Express in Philly steps into the life of Sean Forbes as he prepares to release his debut album, "Perfect Imperfection." Watch the crowds reaction to his inspiring message: http://bit.ly/10849lI

You Can Have Anything...

Connect with Positive People at PositiveAtmosphere.com
We are a community of people helping each other live better through blogs, discussions, videos, photos etc, all free. Join us... www.PositiveAtmosphere.com

A Parent of Deaf Children with CIs Using ASL/English Approach



Click here to watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iU17MLlssbw

A parent of two Deaf children with cochlear implants shares her view about the value of the bilingual approach, including participating in the Shared Reading Project. The mother also shares how she noticed a tremendous improvement in her daughter's academic skills when she has a teacher who is Deaf and is fluent in ASL. She advocates for the type of bilingual instruction that allowed her daughter to advance two grade levels ahead of the normal grade level for her age. Thank you, Theresa for sharing!

ASL Slam, April 12th, 2013

ASL Slam, April 12, 2013, at the Comedy Bar NYC
134 W 29th Street b/t 6th and 7th Ave
6-7p Happy Hour
7-8:30p ASL Slam

ASL Slam, April 12, 2013, at the Comedy Bar NYC
134 W 29th Street b/t 6th and 7th Ave
6-7p Happy Hour
7-8:30p ASL Slam

Decide For Yourself!

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Sunday, 17 March 2013

BSL

http://www.bda.org.uk/

In this anniversity year, the BDA is working to get politicians to focus again on BSL
This March sees ten years since the government first recognised British Sign Language as a UK minority language. Now the British Deaf Association (BDA) is working to get BSL back onto politicians' radar screens.
Get your MP to sign EDM 1167 to support BSL users
As part of the tenth anniversary of the recognition of British Sign Language, Sir Malcolm Bruce MP has put down an "Early Day Motion" (a kind of parliamentary petition) that calls for the government to do more to support BSL users.

No Matter What!

Photo: Share the Inspiration ---->> ♥ Words To Inspire the Soul ♥

Visit our FREE website : www.Daveswordsofwisdom.com for more fun, wisdom and inspiration ♥
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Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Photo: HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY TO YOU ALL!!